Linux OS

Information about the Linux Operating System
What makes it worth while over other operating systems?

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Why Linux?

What does it offer

  • It's Free

    Unlike many other operating systems such as the popular Windows OS and Mac OS, Linux is completely free to install, and just so happens to be more compatible in regards to hardware over popular systems used today.

  • It's Old

    Linux is one of the oldest operating systems to date. Released in 1991, Linux is used by many servers to date, and has provided the foundation of operating systems to many successors. In fact, major systems used today have actually evolved based off of Linux in some way.

  • It's Open-Sourced

    Unlike other Operating Systems, Linux allows you to take a peek under the hood at the source code for verification. While other Operating Systems hide their flaws, if they have any, Linux is completely open to the public. Even with many experienced eyes taking a look at the code, not many flaws have been found.

Linux vs Windows

Linux

                                
  • According to "Why you should try Linux" from PCWorld, Linux is open source and free, meaning it is usable at no cost with the source code visible to everyone online.

  • Linux is very backwards compatible, according to "Why you should try Linux" from PCWorld. That means older computers, and cheaper equipment, can actually run the Linux Operating system better because it is lightweight and powerful. Included with that, any separate older or newer versions of Linux that is created is cataloged on the Linux website, free to view and install.

  • Easy to install and run. Linux can be installed and run on external storage devices ("How to get started with Linux", PCWorld) such as USB drives and hard drives, and does not require much setting up.

Windows

                                
  • In order to install and use Windows, an activation key is required that must be purchased online or by authorized vendors. On top of that, the Windows source code is not open to the public.

  • Windows is not very backwards compatible. According to PCWorld, the Windows Operating system itself contains a lot of bloatware and softwares that slow the computer system down, which keeps growing in size with updates.

  • In order to run Windows, the operating system must be run on an external storage device like Linux, but requires an indepth setup process, agreement to terms, a Microsoft or local account, and acceptance or denial of many other bloatware options.

Linux vs Mac

Linux

                                
  • According to "Why you should try Linux" from PCWorld, Linux is open source and free, meaning it is usable at no cost with the source code visible to everyone online.

  • Linux is very backwards compatible, according to "Why you should try Linux" from PCWorld. Older computers, and cheaper equipment, can actually run the Linux Operating system better because it is lightweight and super powerful. Included with that, any separate older or newer versions of Linux that is created is catalogued on the Linux website, free to view and install.

  • Linux is open sourced and can be looked at freely by the community that uses it, making it very easy to expand upon and keep secure from a business standpoint.

Mac

                                
  • To install and use Mac, a version of the Mac OS must be obtained from a physical Mac machine, or from a shady online website. (Not recommended, but possible)

  • Mac, like Linux, is very backwards compatible with old hardware and is built off of the same Unix-like framework as Linux.

  • Mac is not open sourced and cannot be looked at freely, which gives it an unsecure feeling as some users remain unaware of vulnerabilities that may exist.

Linux Uses

Who is it for?

  • Gaming

    Supports the latest and greatest games, even the older ones, and may be more compatible with some games than other systems.
  • Programming

    Linux is great for creating and testing programs, custom or not. Many Developers today, according to OReilly, use Linux alongside Windows to develop custom software.
  • Website Hosting

    Linux systems can be used to host websites, either templated or custom made. Custom domain names can be easily linked, and having a personal system to monitor is cheaper than online solutions.
  • Server Use

    Can be used as Private or Public servers, ranging from DHCP to HTML to even plain storage servers hosted on a local network. Good for business startups or regular use.